We have selected iconic interior projects from a wide range of known interior decorators. We are pleased to share with you those we believe that are truly talents, including office interior design, corporate interior design, commercial interior design, luxury hotel design and commercial projects. Let’s take a look.

Mehall-Griffey-and-Jerry-Maggis-Home-Italy Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Mehall Griffey and Jerry Maggis Home Italy1

In the drawing room of Mehall Griffey and Jerry Maggi’s home in Catania, Italy, the stucco ceiling and painted concrete-tile flooring are both original to the building. The sofa is by Baxter, the antique tabernacle is Austrian, and the 18th-century Flemish painting was found at a Paris flea market. The walls are painted in Farrow & Ball’s Down Pipe.

Anne-Marie-and-Jorge-Almada-Brussels Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Anne Marie and Jorge Almada Brussels

In the Brussels home of Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada, the velvet sofa, armchairs, bench, and mirror are from the couple’s company, Casamidy. The mantel is original to the early 1900s-era townhouse.

Gilles-Mendels-Home-Paris Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Gilles Mendels Home Paris

In the living room of fashion designer Gilles Mendel’s Paris home, mink upholstery on an Arne Jacobsen Swan chair—and matching fur pillows—pay homage to his family’s couture fur business, J. Mendel.

Kit-and-Tim-Kemps-House-London Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Kit and Tim Kemps House London

In Kit and Tim Kemp’s London townhouse, the British hoteliers employ their signature eclectic style, giving the library a jolt of color with a George Smith armchair upholstered in bright stripes.

Alessandra-Branca-House-Manhattan Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Iconic Interiors: Best Design Projects Alessandra Branca House Manhattan

In her Manhattan pied-à-terre, designer Alessandra Branca shows her Roman roots by covering Italian painted chairs in a Fortuny fabric, and creating a pair of lamps from 18th-century Italian columns.